November 2011  << Back  

An open-label trial of aripiprazole in the treatment of aggression in male adolescents diagnosed with conduct disorder

Samuel Kuperman, MD

Professor of Psychiatry and Head, Division of Child Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA USA

Chadi Calarge, MD

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA USA

Anne Kolar, MD

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA USA

Timothy Holman, MA

Clinical Trial Coordinator, Touro University-California, Vallejo, CA, USA

Mitchell Barnett, PharmD, MS

Associate Professor, College of Pharmacy, Touro University-California, Vallejo, CA, USA

Paul Perry, PhD

Professor, College of Pharmacy, Touro University-California, Vallejo, CA, USA, Emeritus Professor, Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA

BACKGROUND: The adverse effect profiles of typical and atypical antipsychotics are problematic because of their extrapyramidal and endocrine adverse effects, respectively.

METHODS: Ten adolescent male patients diagnosed with conduct disorder received aripiprazole in doses of ≤20 mg/d in an open-label, intent-to-treat design to establish and characterize the efficacy of the drug in reducing aggressive behavior.

RESULTS: Based on clinician and parent observations, aripiprazole was effective in reducing aggressive behavior in adolescent boys. The change in clinician-observed aggression ratings appears to have been driven by a decrease in physical aggression, whereas the change in parent-observed aggression ratings appears to have been driven by a decrease in verbal aggression and aggression against objects and animals.

CONCLUSIONS: Aripiprazole was an effective and relatively well-tolerated treatment for overall aggression in adolescent males with conduct disorder, in the view of both clinicians and parents. Depending on the observer, aripiprazole improved aggression categorized as physical aggression, verbal aggression, and aggression against objects and animals.

KEYWORDS: aggression, aripiprazole, conduct disorder

ANNALS OF CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY 2011;23(4):270-276

CORRESPONDENCE: Paul Perry, PhD, Touro University-California, College of Pharmacy, 1310 Club Lane (Mare Island), Vallejo, CA 94592 USA, E-MAIL: paul.perry@tu.edu
Annals of Clinical Psychiatry ©2011 Quadrant HealthCom Inc.

 
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