February 2014  << Back  

Comparison of family functioning in families of depressed patients and nonclinical control families in China using the Family Assessment Device and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales II

Na Du, MS

Department of Psychiatry, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

Mao-Sheng Ran, MMed, PhD

Department of Social Work and Social Administration, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Department of Psychiatry, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

Su-gai Liang, MS

Department of Psychiatry, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

Ming-jing SiTu, MS

Department of Psychiatry, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

Yi Huang, MD

Department of Psychiatry, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

Abigail K. Mansfield, PhD

The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Gabor Keitner, MD

The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Background: Family functioning influences the course and long-term outcome for patients with depression. It is important to understand the family functioning of depressed patients from the viewpoint both of patients and their family members. The objective of this study was to explore the association between family functioning and depression in a sample of Chinese families, using the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales II (FACES II).

Method: This study was conducted in a sample of 61 depressed patients and their family members and 61 nonclinical controls in mainland China. It compared the perception of depressed patients and their family members and evaluated agreement between family members.

Results: Results indicate that in mainland China, functioning among families with a depressed family member is poorer than that of control families. Depressed patients reported less satisfaction than did their family members. There were significant differences on 4 of the 7 FAD scales among depressed patients and their family members, whereas no discrepancies were found on the FACES II. For the FAD, low agreement between patients and family members was found on all scales except behavioral control. Moderate agreement appeared on all dimensions of FACES II except for ideal cohesion and dissatisfaction with cohesion for the families of depressed patients.

Conclusions: Depression is associated with impaired family functioning in families in mainland China. When applying the FAD and FACES II to samples of Chinese families, clinicians should be aware that the FAD may be more sensitive to detecting problems in some areas than the FACES II.

Keywords: family functioning, depression, Family Assessment Device, Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales II

ANNALS OF CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY 2014;26(1):47-56

CORRESPONDENCE: Yi Huang, MD Department of Psychiatry West China Hospital Sichuan University Chengdu, China 610041 E-MAIL: huangyi0412@126.com
Annals of Clinical Psychiatry ©2014 Quadrant HealthCom Inc.

 
Read full article