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Compulsive sexual behavior in young adults

Brian L. Odlaug, MPH

Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

Katherine Lust, PhD, MPH

Boynton Health Services, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Liana R.N. Schreiber, BA

Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Gary Christenson, MD

Boynton Health Services, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Katherine Derbyshire, BS

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

Arit Harvanko, BA

Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA

David Golden, BA

Boynton Health Services, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Jon E. Grant, JD, MD, MPH

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

BACKGROUND: Compulsive sexual behavior (CSB) is estimated to affect 3% to 6% of adults, although limited information is available on the true prevalence and impact of CSB in young adults. This epidemiological study aims to estimate the prevalence and health correlates of CSB using a large sample of students.

METHODS: The survey examined sexual behaviors and their consequences, stress and mood states, psychiatric comorbidity, and psychosocial functioning.

RESULTS: The estimated prevalence of CSB was 2.0%. Compared with respondents without CSB, individuals with CSB reported more depressive and anxiety symptoms, higher levels of stress, poorer self-esteem, and higher rates of social anxiety disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, compulsive buying, pathological gambling, and kleptomania.

CONCLUSIONS: CSB is common among young adults and is associated with symptoms of anxiety, depression, and a range of psychosocial impairments. Significant distress and diminished behavioral control suggest that CSB often may have significant associated morbidity.

KEYWORDS: health, hypersexuality, impulse control disorders, prevalence, sex, young adult

ANNALS OF CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY 2013;25(3):193-200

CORRESPONDENCE: Brian L. Odlaug, MPH Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences University of Copenhagen Øster Farimagsgade 5A, DK-1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark E-MAIL: brod@sund.ku.dk; odlaug@uchicago.edu
Annals of Clinical Psychiatry ©2013 Frontline Medical Communications Inc.

 
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